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Insane Invisible In Danger
    John Pendygraft/ZUMA (bios)
Story Summary: zReportage.com Story Summary: zReportage.com Story of the Week #749: TUESDAY August 11, 2020: INSANE INVISIBLE IN DANGER, by ZUMA Press Newspaper The Tampa Bay Times photographer John Pendygraft and reporters Leonora LaPeter Anton, Anthony Cormier and Michael Braga, who together spent more than a year investigating and documenting Florida's state-run mental hospitals, exposing institutions shrouded in secrecy. Using those records, the reporters created the first comprehensive database of injuries and violent episodes at Florida's mental hospitals. Florida's state-funded mental hospitals are supposed to be safe places to care for people who are a danger to themselves or others. But years of neglect and $100 million in budget cuts have turned them into treacherous warehouses where violence is out of control and patients can't get the care they need. Since 2009, violent attacks at the state's six largest hospitals have doubled. Nearly 1,000 patients ordered to the hospitals for close supervision managed to injure themselves or someone else. This story won a Pulitzer prize for investigative reporting. Welcome to: INSANE INVISIBLE IN DANGER
Insane Invisible In Danger
    John Pendygraft/ZUMA (bios)
Story Summary: zReportage.com Story Summary: zReportage.com Story of the Week #749: TUESDAY August 11, 2020: INSANE INVISIBLE IN DANGER, by ZUMA Press Newspaper The Tampa Bay Times photographer John Pendygraft and reporters Leonora LaPeter Anton, Anthony Cormier and Michael Braga, who together spent more than a year investigating and documenting Florida's state-run mental hospitals, exposing institutions shrouded in secrecy. Using those records, the reporters created the first comprehensive database of injuries and violent episodes at Florida's mental hospitals. Florida's state-funded mental hospitals are supposed to be safe places to care for people who are a danger to themselves or others. But years of neglect and $100 million in budget cuts have turned them into treacherous warehouses where violence is out of control and patients can't get the care they need. Since 2009, violent attacks at the state's six largest hospitals have doubled. Nearly 1,000 patients ordered to the hospitals for close supervision managed to injure themselves or someone else. This story won a Pulitzer prize for investigative reporting. Welcome to: INSANE INVISIBLE IN DANGER